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the only hank in l.a.

question me here   writer curator propagator fabulist seeker homo about town, lover of men, curator of the lgbtq reading series homo-centric in l.a.

"Nothing more important than this balance…"

"Nothing more important than this balance…"

— 6 hours ago with 1 note
#surfer girl  #barbara crooker  #poetry  #inspiration  #creativity 
Aldous Huxley (born July 26) wrote a few novels that satirized English literary society, and these established him as a writer; it was his fifth book, Brave New World (1932), which arose out of his distrust of 20th-century politics and technology, for which he is most remembered. Huxley started out intending to write a parody of H.G. Wells’ utopian novel Men Like Gods (1923). He ended by envisioning a future where society functions like one of Henry Ford’s assembly lines: a mass-produced culture in which people are fed a steady diet of bland amusements and take an antidepressant called soma to keep themselves from feeling anything negative.
Brave New World is often compared with George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four (1948), since they each offer a view of a dystopian future. Cultural critic Neil Postman spelled out the difference in his 1985 book Amusing Ourselves to Death:
"What Orwell feared were those who would ban books. What Huxley feared was that there would be no reason to ban a book, for there would be no one who wanted to read one. Orwell feared those who would deprive us of information. Huxley feared those who would give us so much that we would be reduced to passivity and egoism. Orwell feared that the truth would be concealed from us. Huxley feared the truth would be drowned in a sea of irrelevance. Orwell feared we would become a captive culture. Huxley feared we would become a trivial culture. … In short, Orwell feared that what we fear will ruin us. Huxley feared that our desire will ruin us."       (text from The Writer’s Almanac)
Seems like Huxley’s winning…

Aldous Huxley (born July 26) wrote a few novels that satirized English literary society, and these established him as a writer; it was his fifth book, Brave New World (1932), which arose out of his distrust of 20th-century politics and technology, for which he is most remembered. Huxley started out intending to write a parody of H.G. Wells’ utopian novel Men Like Gods (1923). He ended by envisioning a future where society functions like one of Henry Ford’s assembly lines: a mass-produced culture in which people are fed a steady diet of bland amusements and take an antidepressant called soma to keep themselves from feeling anything negative.

Brave New World is often compared with George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four (1948), since they each offer a view of a dystopian future. Cultural critic Neil Postman spelled out the difference in his 1985 book Amusing Ourselves to Death:

"What Orwell feared were those who would ban books. What Huxley feared was that there would be no reason to ban a book, for there would be no one who wanted to read one. Orwell feared those who would deprive us of information. Huxley feared those who would give us so much that we would be reduced to passivity and egoism. Orwell feared that the truth would be concealed from us. Huxley feared the truth would be drowned in a sea of irrelevance. Orwell feared we would become a captive culture. Huxley feared we would become a trivial culture. … In short, Orwell feared that what we fear will ruin us. Huxley feared that our desire will ruin us."       (text from The Writer’s Almanac)

Seems like Huxley’s winning…

— 5 days ago with 3 notes
#aldous huxley  #brave new world  #author birthday  #1984  #geore orwell  #writer's almanac  #neil postman  #amusing ourselves to death  #dystopia 

Alberto Giacometti self-portrait 1921 with portraits of Giacometti by Man Ray, Picasso and (my favorite) Gordon Parks.

— 1 week ago with 3 notes
#alberto giacometti  #self-portraits  #man ray  #picasso  #gordon parks 
Go ahead and fail.  
The four essential Tom Robbins (born July 22) books to read are Even Cowgirls Get the Blues, Another Roadside Attraction, Still Life With Woodpecker and Jitterbug Perfume, in that order.  

Go ahead and fail.  

The four essential Tom Robbins (born July 22) books to read are Even Cowgirls Get the Blues, Another Roadside Attraction, Still Life With Woodpecker and Jitterbug Perfume, in that order.  

— 1 week ago with 3 notes
#tom robbins  #author quotes  #author birthday  #go ahead and fail  #creativity  #inspiration  #american authors 

"Maybe I am slightly inhuman … All I ever wanted to do was to paint sunlight on the side of a house."  Edward Hopper (born July 22)

The Whitney has an excellent site from their 2013 exhibition Hopper Drawing.  Especially interesting are the collection of studies Hopper did for his paintings.

— 1 week ago with 1 note
#edward hopper  #american painters  #artist quotes  #artist birthday  #inspiration  #painting  #creativity